Feb
23
3:00pm 3:00pm

Course-based Undergraduate Research Experiences (CUREs) for Higher Education in Science

  • Chemistry Building (091) room 0112 (Marker seminar room) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This semester the CMNS TLC will host a seminar with Gabriela Weaver, a chemistry professor from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Gabriela is the Vice Provost for Faculty Development and the Director of the Center for Teaching and Faculty Development (CTFD) at the UMass Amherst. Gabriela is a national leader in science education research. She envisioned and organized the first Transforming Education conference, an international meeting on the subject of transforming STEM undergraduate education by applying research-based findings to actual classroom practice. Her previous accomplishments also include development of a model for undergraduate chemistry laboratory instruction that engages first- and second-year students in actual scientific research by including them as participants in research projects (NSF-funded CASPiE project). To learn more about Gabriela, visit https://www.umass.edu/ctfd/about/weaver.shtml.

To RSVP follow the link: https://umdsurvey.umd.edu/SE?SID=SV_4PFatTCn7adyyhv&Preview=Survey&Q_CHL=preview

Abstract:

The role of the laboratory in teaching science courses has received attention anew as higher education budgets continue to tighten across the country.  While many faculty members and researchers hope that students will learn about critical thinking and the link between data and scientific claims, typical laboratory courses are taught using prescriptive methods that simplify the logistics of running these courses, but do little to achieve these learning goals.  It is both possible and beneficial, to students and faculty, to integrate real research into required, mainstream laboratory courses in the sciences.  In this presentation, I will discuss recent work by the National Academies of Science on the subject of CUREs.  I will also provide some examples of courses that have been carried out in this way in both chemistry and the biological sciences, as well as data about student learning.

 

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Dec
1
11:00am11:00am

The Global Water Grab Syndrome

Presenter:
Jampel Dell’Angelo
Postdoctoral Fellow, SESYNC

At SESYNC, Jampel conducts research on the institutional drivers and governance conditions of virtual freshwater appropriation associated with global land grabbing and water grabbing. Prior to joining SESYNC, Jampel was a Postdoctoral Research Associate at The Vincent and Elinor Ostrom Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis at Indiana University. At the Ostrom Workshop, he coordinated the social science team on the Kenyan site of an inter-university, interdisciplinary research project on water governance and adaptation to climate change in rural Kenya and United States. He received his dual PhD in December 2013 in Environmental Science and Technology from the Autonomous University of Barcelona and in International Cooperation and Sustainable Development from Sapienza University of Rome. He holds a MS in Environment and Development from the London School of Economics and in Energy and Environmental Management from Sapienza University of Rome. Jampel earned his BS in environmental economics from The University of Siena in Tuscany. Jampel has a passion for video making and, when possible, complements his research in the field with documentary production.

The National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center, funded through an award to the University of Maryland from the National Science Foundation, is a research center dedicated to accelerating scientific discovery at the interface of human and ecological systems. Visit us online at www.sesync.org and follow us on Twitter @SESYNC.

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Nov
17
11:00am11:00am

Are We Giving Back? Perceptions of Urban Agriculture’s Role in Creating Community Capacity

Guest Presenter:
Michael Finewood
Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies and Science, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Pace University

Michael Finewood is a human geographer and political ecologist with research and teaching interests in environmental governance, water, climate change, and urban sustainability, with explicit attention to critical geographies and justice. He earned a PhD in Human Geography from the University of South Carolina, where he trained as a social scientist who works on human/environmental issues. Over his career Dr. Finewood’s interests have focused on environmental perception, expertise, and decision making, with a focus on water and society. He has conducted research on the social and ecological impacts of coastal development in South Carolina and sea level rise in Virginia. His current work centers on stormwater governance in Pittsburgh and the relationship between food production and climate change.

The National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center, funded through an award to the University of Maryland from the National Science Foundation, is a research center dedicated to accelerating scientific discovery at the interface of human and ecological systems. Visit us online at www.sesync.org and follow us on Twitter @SESYNC.

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Nov
10
11:00am11:00am

The Age of Discovery: New Forms of Knowledge for Rural Development in Mozambique

Guest Presenter:
Wendy Wolford
Robert A. and Ruth E. Polson Professor, Department of Development Sociology and Faculty Director, Economic Development Programs, Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future at Cornell University

Wendy Wolford is the Robert A. and Ruth E. Polson Professor of Development Sociology at Cornell University. She is also the Faculty Director of Economic Development Programs in Cornell’s Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future and she co-leads a three-year project on Contested Global Landscapes at Cornell’s Institute for the Social Sciences. Her work addresses issues of resource access and use, particularly in relation to rural development, with a focus on Latin America and sub Saharan Africa. Wendy has worked with local communities, policy makers, and social movements on land reform, new relationships between agriculture and conservation, and bilateral technology transfer projects. Her work has received funding and support from the National Science Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the Social Science Research Council, and the Andrew Mellon Foundation, among others. She has published numerous books and articles, including This Land is Ours Now: Social Mobilizations and the Meanings of Land in Brazil (Duke University Press, 2010), and a co-edited a volume on Governing Global Land Deals: The role of the state in the rush for land (Wiley-Blackwell, 2013).

The National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center, funded through an award to the University of Maryland from the National Science Foundation, is a research center dedicated to accelerating scientific discovery at the interface of human and ecological systems. Visit us online at www.sesync.org and follow us on Twitter @SESYNC.

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Nov
4
3:15pm 3:15pm

Celebration of Life for Mathematics' John Horvath (1924-2015)

  • University of Maryland, MATH 3206 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

You are cordially invited to join the University of Maryland Department of Mathematics for a celebration of the life of John Horváth (1924-2015). John was a faculty member in the department from 1957 until he retired in 1994. He was a “gentleman scholar” in the department, known also as a mathematical encyclopedia. The celebration honoring John will take place on November 4, 2015 from 3:15-4:30 p.m. in Room 3206 of the Mathematics Building.

The celebration will begin with some of John's favorite music (Beethoven’s 7th String Quartet), followed by the viewing of historical photos of John and his family, and the sharing of memories and anecdotes about John. These activities will be followed by high tea. 

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Oct
27
11:00am11:00am

Impacts of Agricultural Decision Making & Adaptive Management on Food Security in Africa

Guest Presenter:
Kelly Caylor
Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University

Despite massive investments in food aid, agricultural extension, and seed/fertilizer subsidies, nearly 1 billion people in the developing world are food insecure and vulnerable to climate variability. Sub-Saharan Africa is most vulnerable, as approximately 25% of its people are undernourished (FAO/FAOSTAT 2013) and 96% of its cropland is rainfed (FAO 2002). The ability of subsistence farmers to respond to changes in water availability involves both inter-and intra-seasonal adaptation. Adaptive capacity diminishes over the season as decisions are made, resources are used, and the set of possible futures becomes restricted. Assessing the intra-seasonal adaptive capacity of smallholders requires integrating physical models of hydrological and agricultural dynamics with farmer decision-making at fine temporal (e.g. weekly) and spatial (e.g. crop field) scales. However, there is an intrinsic challenge to modeling the dynamics of these sociohydrologic systems, because important and uncharacterized spatial and temporal scale mismatches exist between the level at which the water resource is best understood and the level at which human dynamics are more predictable. For example, the skill of current process-based land surface models is primarily confined to short-term (daily to weekly), national- to regional-scale assessments, and reliable agricultural yield estimates and forecasts for small-scale farming systems remain elusive. In contrast, process-based social science modeling has focused on agent-based approaches that generate fine-scale (individual to community) dynamics over rather coarse time scales (yearly to decadal). A major obstacle to addressing this mismatch is the fundamental fact that the highest skill domain of one framework is essentially unpredictable in the other. I present a coupled sociohydrological observation framework designed to addressing this gap, and demonstrate its utility to understand relationships between climate variability, decision making, and crop production for subsistence agriculturalists in Kenya and Zambia.

Professor Caylor is an Associate Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Princeton University. He received his PhD in Environmental Sciences from the University of Virginia, in 2003. His research seeks to develop improved insight into the way that land use and climate change are interacting to affect the dynamics and resilience of global drylands. His primary research sites are in sub-Saharan Africa, where he is focused on understanding the vulnerability of pastoral and subsistence agricultural communities to current and future changes in hydrological dynamics. Professor Caylor conducts research at a number of spatial and temporal scales; from small-scale experiments during individual rainfall events all the way up to continental-scale analyses of climate trends. A major focus of his current research efforts is the development of new methods for using stable isotopes of water to improve the measurement and prediction of ecosystem water use efficiency under varying pastoral land tenure regimes and subsistence agricultural practices. In addition, he is working on the development and deployment of low-cost cellular-based environmental sensors for improved monitoring of agriculture and ecosystem function in the developing world. Professor Caylor is a recipient of an Early Career Award from the NSF, and he was the inaugural recipient of Early Career Award in Hydrological Sciences given by the American Geophysical Union (AGU).

The National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center, funded through an award to the University of Maryland from the National Science Foundation, is a research center dedicated to accelerating scientific discovery at the interface of human and ecological systems. Visit us online at www.sesync.org and follow us on Twitter @SESYNC.

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Oct
20
11:00am11:00am

A Two-Way Road: Integrating Science & Community Engagement to Protect Water Quality & Build Resiliency in a Rural Mountain Environment

Guest Presenter:
Beverley Wemple
Associate Professor of Geography, University of Vermont

Beverley Wemple is an associate professor of Geography and Natural Resources at the University of Vermont. Her work examines the influence of extreme weather events and human land use practices on hydrologic and geomorphic processes in steep mountain catchments. Her work has included field and modeling studies in the western Cascades, northern Appalachians, and northern Andes. She has a particular interest in work that engages with rural communities to inform decision making, resource allocation, and policy formation.

The National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center, funded through an award to the University of Maryland from the National Science Foundation, is a research center dedicated to accelerating scientific discovery at the interface of human and ecological systems. Visit us online at www.sesync.org and follow us on Twitter @SESYNC.

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Land Your Dream Job. Kill It In Your Career. Rock Social Media
Oct
7
5:00pm 5:00pm

Land Your Dream Job. Kill It In Your Career. Rock Social Media

  • University Of Maryland, Chemistry Room 1402 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

All current UMD students and alumni are invited to an engaging talk on careers, a Q&A session, a book signing and a reception with alumna Aliza Licht (B.S. '96, biological sciences), author of the book "Leave Your Mark: Land Your Dream Job. Kill It In Your Career. Rock Social Media."

First 35 students to register will receive a FREE book at the event! Aliza will be available to sign copies of her book, which will be available for sale before and after the talk.

RSVP here.

About Aliza:
Aliza Licht graduated the University of Maryland in 1996 with a B.S. in biological sciences and dreams of becoming a plastic surgeon. After she realized that she couldn't spend a life in scrubs, she decided to pursue her childhood love for fashion and started in the magazine industry. Licht decided to make the jump to fashion public relations in 1998, when she joined Donna Karan International. She is currently the senior vice president of global communications.

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Oct
6
11:00am11:00am

Making Science Matter: Lessons Learned on the Road to Solutions

Guest Presenter:
David Hart
Director, Senator George J. Mitchell Center for Sustainability Solutions and Professor, School of Biology and Ecology, University of Maine

Ever since he became embroiled at the age of 17 in a controversial proposal regarding the environmental and economic future of a coastal California watershed, David Hart has been searching for ways to increase the value of science in societal decision making. Along the way, he has conducted ecological research on a wide range of problems; served as a science advisor to government, the private sector, and NGOs; and co-created a new kind of institution—the Mitchell Center for Sustainability Solutions—designed to help accelerate the transition to sustainability.

The National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center, funded through an award to the University of Maryland from the National Science Foundation, is a research center dedicated to accelerating scientific discovery at the interface of human and ecological systems. Visit us online at www.sesync.org and follow us on Twitter @SESYNC.

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Sep
29
11:00am11:00am

The Human Condition & Environmental Well-Being: When Are They Orthogonal?

Guest Presenter:
Shripad Tuljapurkar
Professor of Biology and the Dean & Virginia Morrison Professor of Population Studies, Stanford University

Shripad Tuljapurkar is Professor of Biology and the Dean & Virginia Morrison Professor of Population Studies at Stanford University. He has done population research for many decades from multiple perspectives: demographic, biodemographic, ecological, and evolutionary. Research areas include stochastic dynamics of human and natural populations; probability forecasts including aging and fiscal balance; prehistoric societies, sustainability, and human welfare; and the evolution of life histories and phenotypic variation.

Tuljapurkar directs Stanford’s Center for Population Research and the demography program at Stanford’s Center for the Demography and Economics of Health and Aging. He is a member of the Center for the Demography and Economics of Aging at the University of California, Berkeley. He has served on review panels at NICHD, NIA, and NSF; led a panel on aging for the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population; and was on a Technical Advisory Panel to the US Social Security Administration. He received the 1996 Mindel Sheps Award from the Population Association of America, and a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship in 1998.

The National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center, funded through an award to the University of Maryland from the National Science Foundation, is a research center dedicated to accelerating scientific discovery at the interface of human and ecological systems. Visit us online at www.sesync.org and follow us on Twitter @SESYNC.

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Sep
24
12:00pm12:00pm

Lecture Luncheon 1: Cognitive and neuroscience of learning

Fall 2015 CMNS Lecturer’s Luncheon Journal Club
Cognitive and neuroscience of learning: What do cognitive and neuroscience tell us about how students learn?

We would like to invite you to a new iteration of our traditional CMNS Lectures’ Luncheon get-togethers. We would like to try a few meetings with a more traditional journal club on the topics of cognitive and neuroscience studies of learning.  There are some interesting papers about this.  We certainly won’t collectively become experts in these fields, but some of us thought it would be fun to read, discuss, and critique a few such articles.
 
The first meeting will be Thursday September 24 at noon.  Lunch will be provided.  Room TBA.
 
For this first meeting Joelle would like to present the following paper.
Just and Mason (2015)  Physics instruction induces changes in neural knowledge representation during successive stages of learning.

This paper and some background reading can be found in this box.umd.edu site

https://umd.box.com/s/1ji6ar07j5eaam0h2bpplhl3afprtaaa

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Sep
22
11:00am11:00am

Land Change Modeling as Socio-Environmental Synthesis

Guest Presenter:
Dan Brown
Professor, School of Natural Resources and Environment; Director, Environmental Spatial Analysis Laboratory; Research Professor, Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research; University of Michigan

Daniel G. Brown (PhD in Geography, 1992, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) is Professor in the School of Natural Resources and Environment at the University of Michigan. His work, published in over 150 refereed articles, chapters, and proceedings papers, has aimed at understanding human–environment interactions through a focus on land use and land cover changes, through modeling these changes, and through spatial analysis and remote sensing methods for characterizing landscape patterns. Recent work has used agent-based and other spatial simulation models to understand and forecast landscape changes that have impacts on carbon storage and other ecosystem services, and human health and well-being. He has conducted field work on three different continents: North America, Asia, and Africa. He has chaired the Land Use Steering Group and Carbon Cycle Steering Group and was a lead coordinating author for the third National Climate Assessment, all under the auspices of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program. In addition, he has served as a member of the NASA Land Cover and Land Use Change Science Team, as panelist for the National Research Council, NASA, EPA, USDA Forest Service, the National Science Foundation, and the European Research Council, and on the Editorial Boards for Landscape Ecology, Computers, Environment and Urban Systems, International Journal of Geographical Information Science, and the Journal of Land Use Science. In 2009 he was elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

The National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center, funded through an award to the University of Maryland from the National Science Foundation, is a research center dedicated to accelerating scientific discovery at the interface of human and ecological systems. Visit us online at www.sesync.org and follow us on Twitter @SESYNC.

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Apr
29
12:00pm12:00pm

Workshop: Maximizing Student Learning with Multimedia Assignments by Media Resources Librarian Andrew Horbal

WORKSHOPS: (Registration Required) Each semester, the TLTC hosts a series of workshops on issues related to teaching and learning. All University of Maryland teachers and others interested in ideas and issues related to teaching and learning are invited to attend. Relevant materials and handouts are provided, and light refreshments are served. 

Wed, 3/4, 12-1:30pm, 6137 McKeldin: Assessment Practices at UMD: Understanding and Comparing Student and Perspectivesby Graduate Teaching Fellows

Thu, 3/26, 12-1:30pm, 6137 McKeldin: Designing Assessments in Online Courses by Jun Yang

Wed, 4/29, 12-1:30pm, 6137 McKeldin: Maximizing Student Learning with Multimedia Assignments by Media Resources Librarian Andrew Horbal

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Apr
29
11:00am11:00am

Grad Student Drop-In Support for Graduate Student Teaching Philosophy Statements

Graduate students at any stage of the writing or editing process are welcome to stop by to receive 1-on-1 editing support for their teaching philosophy with TLTC staff member, Khara Schonfeld-Karan (khara13@umd.edu). 
Spring 2015: Last Wednesday of each month.

Wed, 3/25/15, 11-2, McKeldin 4120

Wed, 4/29/15, 11-2, McKeldin 4120

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Apr
28
12:30pm12:30pm

TLTC Reading Group: Competency Based Education – Spring 2015 Prof. Ben Bederson

Join Associate Provost of Learning Initiatives, Ben Bederson to discuss scholarly writings. Spring 2015 is focused on competency-based education. Details and requested RSVP here.

  • Tue, Mar 3, 12:30-1:30pm, 2109 McKeldin
  • Tue, Mar 31, 12:30-1:30pm, 2109 McKeldin
  • Tue, Apr 14, 12:30-1:30pm, 2109 McKeldin
  • Tue, Apr 28, 12:30-1:30pm, 2109 McKeldin
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Apr
24
8:00am 8:00am

Innovations in Teaching and Learning Conference

The ITL Conference brings the University of Maryland community together to discuss how we support and improve student learning. Whether you are developing innovative pedagogical approaches or applying known ones, deeply integrating technology or relying on paper and human contact, we want you to participate and present. This conference provides an opportunity for the entire university instructional community, from teaching graduate assistants to distinguished university professors to learn from one another and to reflect on how we can improve student learning on campus. 

Location: STAMP Student Union

Fri, Feb 27 - Deadline to submit to Call For Participation
Thu, Apr 23: 12:30-4:30pm - Pre-conference Workshops
Fri, Apr 24: 8-2pm - Conference

 

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Apr
23
12:30pm12:30pm

Innovations in Teaching & Learning : Pre-conference Workshops

The ITL Conference brings the University of Maryland community together to discuss how we support and improve student learning. Whether you are developing innovative pedagogical approaches or applying known ones, deeply integrating technology or relying on paper and human contact, we want you to participate and present. This conference provides an opportunity for the entire university instructional community, from teaching graduate assistants to distinguished university professors to learn from one another and to reflect on how we can improve student learning on campus. 

Location: STAMP Student Union

Fri, Feb 27 - Deadline to submit to Call For Participation
Thu, Apr 23: 12:30-4:30pm - Pre-conference Workshops
Fri, Apr 24: 8-2pm - Conference

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Apr
21
4:00am 4:00am

"Beyond just grammar": Immersing non-native English-speakers in disciplinary writing Drew Fagan

Special Inclusion and Diversity Workshop Series

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Apr
14
12:30pm12:30pm

TLTC Reading Group: Competency Based Education – Spring 2015 Prof. Ben Bederson

Join Associate Provost of Learning Initiatives, Ben Bederson to discuss scholarly writings. Spring 2015 is focused on competency-based education. Details and requested RSVP here.

  • Tue, Mar 3, 12:30-1:30pm, 2109 McKeldin
  • Tue, Mar 31, 12:30-1:30pm, 2109 McKeldin
  • Tue, Apr 14, 12:30-1:30pm, 2109 McKeldin
  • Tue, Apr 28, 12:30-1:30pm, 2109 McKeldin
View Event →
Mar
31
12:30pm12:30pm

TLTC Reading Group: Competency Based Education – Spring 2015 Prof. Ben Bederson

Join Associate Provost of Learning Initiatives, Ben Bederson to discuss scholarly writings. Spring 2015 is focused on competency-based education. Details and requested RSVP here. 

  • Tue, Mar 3, 12:30-1:30pm, 2109 McKeldin
  • Tue, Mar 31, 12:30-1:30pm, 2109 McKeldin
  • Tue, Apr 14, 12:30-1:30pm, 2109 McKeldin
  • Tue, Apr 28, 12:30-1:30pm, 2109 McKeldin
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Mar
30
3:00pm 3:00pm

Visual-spatial skills and learning in the organic chemistry discipline- Bonnie Dixon

  • Bioscience Research Building, Room 1103. (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Hi all,
Bonnie Dixon, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at University of Maryland, will share her research and experience in introductory undergraduate courses in a seminar.

Title: Visual-spatial skills and learning in the organic chemistry discipline

Day: Monday, March 30, 2015

Time: 3:00-4:00

Room: Bioscience Research Building, Room 1103.

Abstract: Visual spatial skills are vital for success in the chemistry discipline, particularly in organic chemistry and biochemistry, where students are asked to understand the three-dimensional nature of molecules in order to infer functional roles for the molecules in question. In general, chemists study material at the microscopic level in three dimensions. In order to bring the microscopic world to life, diagrams are used to represent molecules. There are many different types of diagrams, and each diagram is used to highlight a novel piece of the structure. My research focused on methods for teaching and learning the spatial relationships in organic chemistry, specifically centered on how students used and interpreted the diagrams of molecules.  One of my studies focuses on comparing three different teaching methodologies to use and manipulate diagrams (analytic strategies, imagistic strategies, and a mixed approach) and measures student success on visual-spatial tasks in organic chemistry.  A second study focuses on the use of models as a tool to learn visual-spatial tasks in organic chemistry.  The results of both of the studies show that highlighting the connection between the three-dimensional nature of molecules and the diagrams leads to the most student success.  

For more information contact Gili Marbach-Ad at gilim@umd.edu

Thanks,
Gili.

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Mar
26
12:00pm12:00pm

Workshop: Assessment Practices at UMD: Understanding and Comparing Student and Perspectives by Graduate Teaching Fellows

WORKSHOPS: (Registration Required) Each semester, the TLTC hosts a series of workshops on issues related to teaching and learning. All University of Maryland teachers and others interested in ideas and issues related to teaching and learning are invited to attend. Relevant materials and handouts are provided, and light refreshments are served. 

Wed, 3/4, 12-1:30pm, 6137 McKeldin: Assessment Practices at UMD: Understanding and Comparing Student and Perspectives by Graduate Teaching Fellows

Thu, 3/26, 12-1:30pm, 6137 McKeldin: Designing Assessments in Online Courses by Jun Yang

Wed, 4/29, 12-1:30pm, 6137 McKeldin: Maximizing Student Learning with Multimedia Assignments by Media Resources Librarian Andrew Horbal

 

View Event →
Mar
26
12:00pm12:00pm

Workshop: Designing Assessments in Online Courses by Jun Yang

WORKSHOPS: (Registration Required) Each semester, the TLTC hosts a series of workshops on issues related to teaching and learning. All University of Maryland teachers and others interested in ideas and issues related to teaching and learning are invited to attend. Relevant materials and handouts are provided, and light refreshments are served. 

Wed, 3/4, 12-1:30pm, 6137 McKeldin: Assessment Practices at UMD: Understanding and Comparing Student and Perspectivesby Graduate Teaching Fellows

Thu, 3/26, 12-1:30pm, 6137 McKeldin: Designing Assessments in Online Courses by Jun Yang

Wed, 4/29, 12-1:30pm, 6137 McKeldin: Maximizing Student Learning with Multimedia Assignments by Media Resources Librarian Andrew Horbal

View Event →
Mar
25
11:00am11:00am

Grad Student Drop-In Support for Graduate Student Teaching Philosophy Statements

Graduate students at any stage of the writing or editing process are welcome to stop by to receive 1-on-1 editing support for their teaching philosophy with TLTC staff member, Khara Schonfeld-Karan (khara13@umd.edu). 
Spring 2015: Last Wednesday of each month.

Wed, 3/25/15, 11-2, McKeldin 4120

Wed, 4/29/15, 11-2, McKeldin 4120

View Event →
Mar
13
10:30am10:30am

Seminar: Transforming Students by Peter Felten

Peter Felten, Elon University
Transforming Students (RSVP)
Friday, March 13, 10:30am-noon
6137 McKeldin (Special Events Room)

Abstract: The university can and should be a life-changing place for students. Too often, however, students drift through the academy, learning little that lasts. In order to effect transformation of students' lives, we the faculty have to be willing to change how we do things and develop new experiences for students. This seminar will explore research into the nature and qualities of university experiences that challenge students to develop the knowledge, skills, and commitments that allow them to thrive in a rapidly changing world. While we cannot guarantee transformation, certain practices create conditions that foster deep learning.

Peter Felten is the Assistant Provost for Teaching and Learning, Director of the Center for Engaged Learning, and Professor of History at Elon University. His publications include the co-authored books Transforming Students: Fulfilling the Promise of Higher Education (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014) and Engaging Students as Partners in Learning and Teaching: A Guide for Faculty(Jossey-Bass, 2014). He also is co-editor of the International Journal for Academic Development and vice president (US) of the International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.

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Mar
3
12:30pm12:30pm

TLTC Reading Group: Competency Based Education – Spring 2015 Prof. Ben Bederson

Join Associate Provost of Learning Initiatives, Ben Bederson to discuss scholarly writings. Spring 2015 is focused on competency-based education. Details and requested RSVP here.

Tue, Mar 3, 12:30-1:30pm, 2109 McKeldin

Tue, Mar 31, 12:30-1:30pm, 2109 McKeldin

Tue, Apr 14, 12:30-1:30pm, 2109 McKeldin

Tue, Apr 28, 12:30-1:30pm, 2109 McKeldin

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